The Q at Parkside

(for those for whom the Parkside Q is their hometrain)

News and Nonsense from the Brooklyn neighborhood of Lefferts and environs, or more specifically a neighborhood once known as Melrose Park. Sometimes called Lefferts Gardens. Or Prospect-Lefferts Gardens. Or PLG. Or North Flatbush. Or Caledonia (west of Ocean). Or West Pigtown. Across From Park Slope. Under Crown Heights. Near Drummer's Grove. The Side of the Park With the McDonalds. Jackie Robinson Town. Home of Lefferts Manor. West Wingate. Near Kings County Hospital. Or if you're coming from the airport in taxi, maybe just Flatbush is best.

Thursday, September 4, 2014

123 on the Park: More Popular Than the Hospital Ever Was

The building, Joseph Chetrit and David Bistricer, the owner/developers

The former Caledonian Hospital has hit 50% capacity. That's right, 123 on the Park is now half-way full, w/ it's studio starting at $2,250, according to Mark Mauer and the Real Deal.

I don't know what more I can say. Except that when I started writing this blog, I was bitching about how awful it was that someone would let that building decay, garbage, graffiti, weeds. That seems like a lifetime ago. And in many ways, it was.

Here's a post from the archives in 2010.





3 comments:

lenoX said...

man i'd love to peek inside these and see if a park view is really worth $2250 for a studio, but the open houses are happening today during work hours (5pm-7pm). i don't know why they don't just have em on the weekend like the rest of the world does

Parkside_Guy said...

Looks like all the haters out there are wrong again!

Clarkson FlatBed said...

Wrong about what? That rental properties are popular and expensive?

If you're looking for haters, the mirror is in the bathroom.

Not sure whom you're referring to, but I haven't heard anyone complain about the repurposing of the old hospital. Nor do many complain about the building of new apartments. You haven't been following the story if you think they have. Questions of zoning and density, and yes gentrification, are significantly more nuanced than you give them credit for.